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2012 NCAA Television Revenue By Conference

May
10
2012
By
Category: Editorial, Featured News

ncaa tv contracts 2012 NCAA Television Revenue By Conference

As we’ve done in 2011 and  previous years, here’s an updated list for the 2012 NCAA television revenue by conference for the BCS conferences. Note that there will be additional changes once league specific networks (like Pac-12 Network) are generating more money. Other contracts are expected to be altered to reflect new membership additions such as ACC, SEC and Big 12. The Big East contract is next up for renewal. The value is expected to be much lower with the losses of Syracuse, Pittsburgh and WVU but will still increase due to inflated value within the industry for conference television contracts. The per school increase for the Big East will likely rise as well, even with the membership growing to 13 members.

 

 

 

Atlantic%20Coast%20Conference 2012 NCAA Television Revenue By ConferenceACC

15 years, $3.6 billion, ESPN (through 2027)
Annual: $240 million

Average Annual per School: $17.1 million

Notes: ACC also expected to take it’s own share, bringing the average per school annual payout to $16 million per year

 

 

 

Big%20East%20Conference 2012 NCAA Television Revenue By Conference

Big East
6 years, $200 million, ABC/ESPN [CBS contributes $9 million of total] (through 2013)
Annual: $40 million

Average Annual per School: $3.18 million for football schools, $1.56 million for non-football schools

Notes: Big East is next conference up for renewal. Total is expected to be far below the $1.4 billion they turned down.

 

 

 

Big%20Ten%20Conference 2012 NCAA Television Revenue By ConferenceBig Ten

10 years, $1 billion, ABC/ESPN (through 2016)
25 years, +$2.8 billion, Big Ten Network (through 2032)
6 years, $145 million, Fox (B1G championship game through 2016)
Annual: $236 million
Average Annual per School: $19.7-$22 million

 

 

 

 

Big%20Twelve%20Conference 2012 NCAA Television Revenue By ConferenceBig 12

13 years, $1.2 billion, Fox (through 2025)
13 years, $1.4 billion, ABC/ESPN (through 2025)
Annual: $200 million
Average Annual per School: $20 million
Notes: Schools control Tier 3 rights, so each school can gain even more annual revenue on it’s own. Also worth noting, that the 10 schools are expected to extend their rights waiver for the additional years, 13 in total. So no members would be leaving the Big 12 knowing that they would risk losing so much revenue. Expansion is on the table for the Big 12, especially given the large revenue bump. So if the right 2 schools were available, the Big 12 would expand and renegotiate it’s television fees beforehand. Florida St., Notre Dame and Clemson remain at the top of the wish list while Louisville remains the more likely initial candidate.

 

 

 

Pacific%2010%20Conference 2012 NCAA Television Revenue By ConferencePac-12

12 years, $2.7 billion, Fox/ABC/ESPN (through 2024)
Annual: $225 million (* $505 million potential)
Average Annual per School: $20.2 million ($18.8 million from Fox/ABC/ESPN  with $30-$50 million projected with Pac-12 Network)
* Pac-12 Network: the network will launch in 2012 with a primary network and 6 regional networks. Revenue projections combined are expected to be in the same range if not more than the Big Ten Network, which produces $280 million per year at $11 million per school.
Notes:  New members Utah and Colorado receive 50% share in 2012, 75% share in 2012, 100% share in 2014

 

 

 

Southeastern%20Conference 2012 NCAA Television Revenue By ConferenceSEC

15 years, $2.25 billion, ESPN (through 2024)
15 years, $825 million, CBS (through 2024)
Annual: $205 million
Average Annual per School: $17.1 million
Notes: contract is expected to be renegotiated in time with the additions of Texas A&M and Missouri, likely before the 2024 expiration. The SEC may be on it’s way to starting it’s own network that depending on future additions, could gain the conference and additional $10-$20 million per school per year). While the SEC currently ranks below 4 other conferences in revenue, that is expected to change sooner than later.

OTHERS:

Conference%20USA 2012 NCAA Television Revenue By ConferenceCUSA
5 years, $35 million, CBS College Sports (through 2016)
5 years, $35 million, Fox (through 2016)
Annual: $14 million
Average Annual per School: $1.17 million
Notes: CUSA and the MWC are expected to form a football alliance in order to negotiate a single TV contract for that sport.

 

 

 

Mountain%20West%20Conference 2012 NCAA Television Revenue By ConferenceMountain West
10 years, $120 million, CBS College Sports (through 2016)
Annual: $12 million
Average Annual per School: $1.33 million
Notes: losses and additions now have the MWC at 10 members with Hawaii as a football only member, will lower per school payout. The MWC ended their own channel, Mtn this year. CUSA and the MWC are expected to form a football alliance in order to negotiate a single TV contract for that sport.

 

 

More figures here and here

 

Overall Notes:
Note that many of these figures are fluid due to issues such as conference specific networks and their revenue growth potential. Per school payouts wil vary as well due to specific conferences distribution processes and their own TV rights factored in.

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  • Drew

    Your figures are way off … or someone threw in a bunch of nice looking and attractive numbers to attract the non-AQs in the wake of the Big East exodus. No one (from what I’ve been seeing) is interested in UCon football, etc ….

  • Student

    Hi, I’m doing research for my Sport Industry class, and I’m wondering where all of your figures come from? I would like to use some of this information in my presentation if I can verify it.

  • C-USA

    Another unknown is how much the Big East’s new media rights deal, which the league starts renegotiating on Sept. 1, will be worth.

    Last year the Big East turned down a nine-year, $1.4 billion deal ($155 million per year), which would have been worth about $14.3 million a year to the full members and about $3.2 million to the non-football members.

    If the Big East’s new deal is worth the same amount per year ($155 million) each school would receive a smaller amount than the deal the league turned down last year because there are now more members. Full members would receive about $11.4 million per year, football-only members Boise State and San Diego State would receive about $8.4 million annually and non-football members about $3 million a year.

    Former CBS Sports president Neil Pilson recently told the New York Times he thought the Big East’s deal would exceed the $155 million per year deal the league turned down last year. However, industry sources told CBSSports.com that they believe the Big East’s new media rights will be worth substantially less than $155 million per year. That’s because when the Big East starts negotiating, about $8 billion will have been spent on recent college football deals, so there won’t be as much money available..

    With the elimination of AQ in the BCS and the fact that the C-USA has expanded into large fast growing media markets, the C-USA could in a few years close the gap with the big east. The Big East is not scheduled to renegotiate it’s television contract until September. C-USA needs to immediately negotiate new TV contracts and beat the Big East to the table.

    C-USA has added a combination of established and emerging programs. Four of the five schools bring a market size ranked among the top 36 in the country and totaling over two million more TV households than the league held this past year. Now that ODU as committed that wll bring an additional 718,750 households, totaling close
    to three million additional TV households. Five of the six schools are in the fastest growing media markets. Four of
    the six schools are media markets without direct competition from other major Universities or Pro teams.

    After realignment the C-USA increase the number of large media markets in markets and dramatically increase the
    number of television households. The C-USA has position itself for better long-term growth than any other
    conference. None of the other conferences have any room for growth, they have already saturated their markets.

    C-USA was clever enough to expand within it’s hold geographical foot print, yet add new large media markets
    like San Antonio, Charlotte, Miami, and Norfolk and secure itself in the DFW market.

    The C-USA is located in the fastest geographical region of the country. According to the US Census Bureau, from
    2000 to 2010, regional growth was much faster for the South and West (14.3 and 13.8 percent, respectively) than
    for the Midwest (3.9 percent) and Northeast (3.2 percent).

    While expanding, the C-USA avoided media markets dominated by the SEC or the ACC. After realignment, the C-USA
    loss Memphis and Orlando to the Big East. Although major media markets, the both of these markets were highly
    competitive. The Tennessee market is relatively small and is being dominated by the University of Tennessee and
    Vanderbilt both of the SEC. Similarly the Florida market is dominated by the ACC and the SEC.

    The C-USA can offered television networks a conference that includes large rapidly growing media markets with a
    huge number of television households, in the fastest growing region in the country without offering little or no direct competition to the network’s existing contracts with any of other large conferences including the SEC, the ACC, The B1G,or the BIG 12.

  • C-USA

    Another unknown is how much the Big East’s new media rights deal, which the league starts renegotiating on Sept. 1, will be worth.

    Last year the Big East turned down a nine-year, $1.4 billion deal ($155 million per year), which would have been worth about $14.3 million a year to the full members and about $3.2 million to the non-football members.

    If the Big East’s new deal is worth the same amount per year ($155 million) each school would receive a smaller amount than the deal the league turned down last year because there are now more members. Full members would receive about $11.4 million per year, football-only members Boise State and San Diego State would receive about $8.4 million annually and non-football members about $3 million a year.

    Former CBS Sports president Neil Pilson recently told the New York Times he thought the Big East’s deal would exceed the $155 million per year deal the league turned down last year. However, industry sources told CBSSports.com that they believe the Big East’s new media rights will be worth substantially less than $155 million per year. That’s because when the Big East starts negotiating, about $8 billion will have been spent on recent college football deals, so there won’t be as much money available..

    With the elimination of AQ in the BCS and the fact that the C-USA has expanded into large fast growing media markets, the C-USA could in a few years close the gap with the big east. The Big East is not scheduled to renegotiate it’s television contract until September. C-USA needs to immediately negotiate new TV contracts and beat the Big East to the table.

    C-USA has added a combination of established and emerging programs. Four of the five schools bring a market size ranked among the top 36 in the country and totaling over two million more TV households than the league held this past year. Now that ODU as committed that wll bring an additional 718,750 households, totaling close
    to three million additional TV households. Five of the six schools are in the fastest growing media markets. Four of
    the six schools are media markets without direct competition from other major Universities or Pro teams.

    After realignment the C-USA increase the number of large media markets in markets and dramatically increase the
    number of television households. The C-USA has position itself for better long-term growth than any other
    conference. None of the other conferences have any room for growth, they have already saturated their markets.

    C-USA was clever enough to expand within it’s hold geographical foot print, yet add new large media markets
    like San Antonio, Charlotte, Miami, and Norfolk and secure itself in the DFW market.

    The C-USA is located in the fastest geographical region of the country. According to the US Census Bureau, from
    2000 to 2010, regional growth was much faster for the South and West (14.3 and 13.8 percent, respectively) than
    for the Midwest (3.9 percent) and Northeast (3.2 percent).

    While expanding, the C-USA avoided media markets dominated by the SEC or the ACC. After realignment, the C-USA
    loss Memphis and Orlando to the Big East. Although major media markets, the both of these markets were highly
    competitive. The Tennessee market is relatively small and is being dominated by the University of Tennessee and
    Vanderbilt both of the SEC. Similarly the Florida market is dominated by the ACC and the SEC.

    The C-USA can offered television networks a conference that includes large rapidly growing media markets with a
    huge number of television households, in the fastest growing region in the country without offering little or no direct competition to the network’s existing contracts with any of other large conferences including the SEC, the ACC, The B1G,or the BIG 12.

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