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PostPosted: Sun Mar 29, 2015 1:50 pm 
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The Bishin Cutter, that is a reasonable point about implications, but does not define the motive. Remember, the deciders were the 5 power conferences plus Notre Dame. That has been a set structured group evolving from the former BCS group, and refined given the demise of the old BE as we knew it. Is the SEC's intent to retain the Power 5 structure, showing plus three independents, instead of plus just Notre Dame? Concur on the 03 post, the inclusion of BYU and Army was about SEC choice/optional scheduling, and not about P5 governance. By the act of the SEC declaring that BYU and Army are allowable for that one OOC game to satisfy the 9th game minimum, will that propel BYU and Army into full inclusion by all the P5? I don't think so. BYU already had complaints about the P5 freeze-out, so what the SEC did was toss them a bone, not a whole P5 cow, that was also in the perceived self-interest of the SEC. For them (BYU and Army) to get there, convincing evidence would have to come from those schools totality of schedules and records over some chosen period of time. It's not going to be based, at most, on one game per year vs an SEC team. BYU has ambitions to join a P5 conference and will take every given opportunity to schedule elite schools. Army, on the other hand, has not shown that ambition, and over the more recent years, has tried to make their scheduling more compatible with their capabilities. The SEC is not the whole P5, and the scheduling accommodation that the conference extended, does not even suggest the SEC would push or vote for BYU/Army as being a part of P5 governance.
The SEC and the ACC got pressure from BYU about scheduling. There is evidence for that. The complaint was about only including Notre Dame from the independent ranks that numbered only three as a total. The ACC could easily justify their decision because Notre Dame was already associated with the ACC.
What is little known but some SEC schools were saying it (or complaining including mighty Alabama), is that certain SEC teams were having trouble finding P5 teams to schedule for certain dates and years. All of them do have to incorporate dictates for their own in-conference schedules. Texas A&M, for example, could find UCLA for a series, but forget about the B12. Adding BYU to the mix was a scheduling relief, and a desired option, given that BYU got some SEC games as soon as hints developed. Plus, BYU does have athletic credentials that are not shabby. The Army thing? It looks as if it was done by the SEC not to deliberately diminish them as a result of adding BYU. The military is popular in the south, and given Army's other attributes mentioned, it was viewed strategically wise to include them. If there were other independents, there would have been political cover to be more limited with the decision, or not change the original one. While it brings into question future independents that may seek the same from the SEC or the ACC, it has broaden the status, at least for SEC scheduling purposes, that only Notre Dame could benefit beforehand by being independent.

The SEC, by default, is telling the other two SAs' their games with SEC opponents will not be a 9th P5. But that alone would not motivate them to become independent either. I imagine Navy is not so thrilled about going into the AAU anyway. Air Force appears happy where they are at, and rejected the B12 offer a few years back. But the B12 didn't accept Louisville, Go figure.
Could the ACC ever do something with Navy, given Maryland leaving and if Notre Dame ever becomes #15? It's an on-going interesting thought, but SA recruitment limitations and regimental structures suggest not.


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PostPosted: Mon Mar 30, 2015 4:59 pm 
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The ACC has some decent options for expansion: Navy, Notre Dame, West Virginia, Connecticut, Cincinnati, possibly Temple, Miami-OH, Army and UCF.

If Wake Forest ever "falls down the stairs" and/or the SEC takes North Carolina, Duke or NC State, expect to see some of the schools listed above added. Obviously, Notre Dame stands apart from the rest, but West Virginia is no slouch. The only major knock is academics, but their academics are set up to help the citizens of West Virginia get into West Virginia which is commendable. Every state school should have the same goal, to a fault if necessary. After all, every tax payer in West Virginia is sponsoring WVU, those same tax payers should have first dibs at getting in. Now, obviously it gets more complicated than this, but factor in West Virginia's loyal fan base and athletic success on a national level and at that point it is just good old fashioned snobbery that is keeping them out. Stanford plays in the same conference as Oregon State. No P5 academic gap from first to last is bigger than that; not even the gap between Duke and West Virginia. Rice shares a conference with several Tier 3 schools for another example. Lastly, even the gap between schools within the Ivy League is noticeable.

As far as Navy specifically, that would sure make Notre Dame happy. Army, Navy, Notre Dame IN for Wake Forest, NC State, Florida State OUT is still an upgrade for the ACC. Barely, but it is. Notre Dame has enough overall prestige and athletic clout to overcome the absence of Florida State. Army and Navy the combo is more nationally marketable than Wake and NCSt. There definitely would be a drop off in athletics, but Army and Navy could simply lower their admission standards (as even Harvard does) to compete. Navy is annually better in football than many ACC schools and David Robinson did play there for basketball in the last 30 years for whatever that is worth. Army would be the "new Wake Forest" only much worse in major sports barring a major lowering of admission standards. I'm also not sure if either Army or Navy have Women's Teams.


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PostPosted: Fri May 29, 2015 9:51 am 
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ESPN report that SEC has announced 2014-2015 revenue distribution at about $436.8 million or about $31.2 million per school.Link at http://espn.go.com/college-sports/story ... er-schools


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PostPosted: Sun May 31, 2015 11:32 pm 
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24-School SEC idea:

Pod 1: Florida, Florida State, Georgia, Georgia Tech
Pod 2: South Carolina, Clemson, North Carolina, North Carolina State
Pod 3: Alabama, Auburn, Mississippi, Mississippi State
Pod 4: Louisiana State, Arkansas, Missouri, Texas A&M
Pod 5: Tennessee, Vanderbilt, Kentucky, West Virginia
Pod 6: Texas, Texas Christian, Oklahoma, Oklahoma State

~

Pod 1: No more splitting the talent-rich states of Florida and Georgia with the ACC.
Pod 2: Add the State of North Carolina, significantly improve SEC basketball.
Pod 3: No point in separating heated rivals. Alabama-Tennessee is now an ESPN2-level thing at best. The ones here are ESPN and CBS only.
Pod 4: A pod that covers a lot of territory, but makes sense.
Pod 5: One pod has to be the worst and this is it. The basketball here is really good though.
Pod 6: Two "ace jewels". Texas Tech is too far away and Dallas/Fort Worth is more fun away team fans than Lubbock. TCU's highs in football are much higher than Tech's.

Where's Virginia? Hey, it's not perfect, but for 24 schools, this is the best I can come up with.


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PostPosted: Mon Jun 01, 2015 11:00 am 
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@bigshotbob

I like the idea in theory but no major conference will ever pass 18 teams. At most, I expect there to be 4 Power Conferences of 16 teams by 2026.

But I wouldn't be surprised to see the leftover schools + the best of the MWC and American make THE 24 Champions FBS conference one day.

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PostPosted: Mon Jun 01, 2015 5:03 pm 
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bigshotbob wrote:
24-School SEC idea:

Pod 1: Florida, Florida State, Georgia, Georgia Tech
Pod 2: South Carolina, Clemson, North Carolina, North Carolina State
Pod 3: Alabama, Auburn, Mississippi, Mississippi State
Pod 4: Louisiana State, Arkansas, Missouri, Texas A&M
Pod 5: Tennessee, Vanderbilt, Kentucky, West Virginia
Pod 6: Texas, Texas Christian, Oklahoma, Oklahoma State

~

Pod 1: No more splitting the talent-rich states of Florida and Georgia with the ACC.
Pod 2: Add the State of North Carolina, significantly improve SEC basketball.
Pod 3: No point in separating heated rivals. Alabama-Tennessee is now an ESPN2-level thing at best. The ones here are ESPN and CBS only.
Pod 4: A pod that covers a lot of territory, but makes sense.
Pod 5: One pod has to be the worst and this is it. The basketball here is really good though.
Pod 6: Two "ace jewels". Texas Tech is too far away and Dallas/Fort Worth is more fun away team fans than Lubbock. TCU's highs in football are much higher than Tech's.

Where's Virginia? Hey, it's not perfect, but for 24 schools, this is the best I can come up with.


I've tossed around a similar idea before with a lot of the same schools. A conference or alliance arrangement that included all of these schools would borderline on a college football monopoly as they would have the power to flex some considerable muscle in dictating their (and for that matter everyone else's) television value. If anyone could pull something like this off it would be the SEC. I think the natural result is that the Big Ten and PAC 12 would go into panic mode and scramble to grow their own leagues.

As much as expansionist junkies like to salivate over ideas like this, I'm not sure we will ever see it. The SEC likes to tote its exclusiveness and eliteness and I'm not sure they open their doors like this when they already are in great spot. think about the overall expansion climate out there:

Texas and Oklahoma are the only blue blood jewels out there that bring great value and strong football history.
Florida St, Miami, Clemson, Georgia Tech, and Louisville schools are seen as duplicated markets in the eyes of the SEC. They seem to avoid these schools like the plague and their instate rivals want to keep them down and at a disadvantage.
Virginia and North Carolina schools only are intriguing because the SEC wants subscription money for the SEC Network from those populous states.
Who knows how long Baylor or TCU will stay good. OSU and TTU don't offer much. WVU literally only got into the Big 12 because they were contractually obligated to have a 10th school. The SEC passed on them before already.

Thoughts anyone?


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PostPosted: Mon Jun 01, 2015 7:32 pm 
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Concerning expansion candidates, I look at the reasons for leaving as established by these schools: Colorado, Nebraska, Texas A&M, Missouri, Maryland. All other recent moves were situations wherein it was just a school moving from Triple-A to the Major Leagues. So, what reasons for leaving did those five establish?

Colorado: We have more in common with them than we have in common with you.
Nebraska: Academics.
Texas A&M: Little Brother is sick and tired of Big Brother.
Missouri: New territory for the new conference.
Maryland: Help! We're broke!

For argument's sake, assume that there is no sixth reason possible (even though there is an infinite number of reasons to leave a conference). Using these five reasons as a guide, do any current P5 schools share anything in common with these five that joined another P5 from a P5?

Long story short, not really (or at least not many), but here are a few I could reasonably come up with...

Kansas: Academics
Virginia Tech: New territory for the new conference.
Notre Dame to the ACC and not the Big Ten if ever forced to join a conference: We have more in common with them than we have in common with you.
Miami: Help! We're broke! (Big 12 might have a legit shot at them. Miami has zero aversion to being a geographic outlier as their extensive Big East history shows.)
North Carolina State: Little Brother thing... but *sighs* not really. Just wanted to use this reason one time for the sake of debate. UNC has never done anything on the level of attempting to broadcast High School Games of Tar Heel Recruits.

And since I briefly mentioned it, Connecticut would follow the path of Rutgers and West Virginia if they someday make it to the Big Leagues.


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PostPosted: Tue Jun 16, 2015 12:42 pm 
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The SEC, from day one, gives new members their full shares in the revenue distribution.

Here's an article entitled "Texas A&M and Missouri Know It Pays to be in the SEC Rather than the Big 12" (The Times-Picayne; Ron Higgins, NOLA.com;6/01/2015).

http://www.nola.com/lsu/index.ssf/2015/ ... ow_it.html


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PostPosted: Tue Jun 16, 2015 3:53 pm 
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sec03 wrote:
The SEC, from day one, gives new members their full shares in the revenue distribution.

Here's an article entitled "Texas A&M and Missouri Know It Pays to be in the SEC Rather than the Big 12" (The Times-Picayne; Ron Higgins, NOLA.com;6/01/2015).

http://www.nola.com/lsu/index.ssf/2015/ ... ow_it.html" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;


That's nothing to sneeze at, either. This is something the Big Ten has done wrong, and it probably has cost them membership that would have dramatically altered all of the D1 landscape.


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 24, 2015 10:38 am 
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Dennis Dodd article discussing early FB signing period talk and possible impact on the SEC at http://www.cbssports.com/collegefootbal ... to-the-sec


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