NCAA Conference Realignment & Expansion Message Boards
NCAA Map

Discussions by Conference:
  It is currently Tue Oct 21, 2014 7:07 am

Help support CollegeSportsInfo.com by shopping

All times are UTC - 5 hours




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 107 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 ... 8  Next
Author Message
PostPosted: Mon Jun 16, 2003 2:02 am 
Offline
Freshman
Freshman

Joined: Mon Jun 16, 2003 1:54 am
Posts: 10
With Flordia A&M the latest to join the list of teams applying for 1-A status, what other teams want to or should jump to 1-A football. Just to thow some schools out that might be able to make the jump: Deleware, Montana, Youngstown State, McNeese St., North Carolina A&T, UMass, and Flordia Atlantic.


Last edited by datrain021 on Tue Jun 17, 2003 2:16 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Jun 16, 2003 5:36 am 
Offline
All-Star
All-Star

Joined: Thu Jun 12, 2003 1:09 pm
Posts: 1540
Villanova


Last edited by friarfan on Mon Jun 16, 2003 6:00 am, edited 1 time in total.

Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Jun 16, 2003 5:48 am 
Offline
All-Star
All-Star

Joined: Wed May 21, 2003 8:39 am
Posts: 1055
Location: Alabama
Mcneese St. ,Texas State University-San Marcos ie swt state. and Goergia Southern

_________________
The Bear may be dead but he still hates Tennessee. Roll Damn Tide


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Jun 16, 2003 7:30 am 
Offline
All-Conference
All-Conference

Joined: Mon Dec 09, 2002 1:17 pm
Posts: 822
Location: Dothan, AL for the time being.

Quote:
With Flordia A&M the latest to join the list of teams applying for 1-A status, what other teams want to or should jump to 1-A football. Just to thow some schools out that might be able to make the jump: Deleware, Montana, Youngstown State, McNeese St., North Carolina A&T, UMass, and Flordia Atlantic.


Montana should have made the jump a long time ago. However, the Grizzlies insist on immediate BCS status on jumping to I-A. Because of that, I don't see them making the jump anytime soon. Montana State, however, is a possibility, and they might be able to force the Griz to move up as well. Youngstown State is able to compete at the I-A level athletically. In terms of finances and a fanbase, I don't think it would be a very good idea for YSU. There are too many I-A programs in Ohio already. If ULM goes under (I hope they don't though. They have done the Sunbelt a few favors, and the Sunbelt probably owes a lot of existence to ULM) , McNeese would be a good candidate to replace them. The only bad thing I see about McNeese is that they are very close to TAMU territory, and I see more fans in that part of Louisiana going to TAMU games as opposed to McNeese games if McNeese went IA. Georgia Southern has something very similar working against it. To the north of Statesboro is UGa & USC. To the south is UF. To the west is Auburn & FSU. It's very tough to compete with that crowd, although Troy State is doing it & FAMU will be also facing that same challenge. Delaware (not Deleware ::) ) pondered going IA once, but decided against it.
NC A&T could very well make the jump also. East Carolina has carved themselves out a very nice niche for themselves in NC, and I'm sure NC A&T could find a niche for themselves also. One thing working in A&T's favor is that there are really only two football schools in the state of North Carolina: NC State & East Carolina. UNC has long had an apathetic attitude towards football, despite the fact that they really have some great football facilities. :( Duke & Wake are really too much into football either, although Wake is making some strides. If UMass went IA, and really focused on making a splash in IA, they could really blow Boston College right out of the water, & BC is really UMass only competition. Florida Atlantic needs some more time before going IA.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Jun 16, 2003 8:58 am 
Offline
All-Star
All-Star

Joined: Fri May 02, 2003 12:39 pm
Posts: 1215
I haven't found anything concerning Ga Southern and a jump to 1-A, but would not be surprised if it happens. The school has slightly more students than Ga Tech, fills in the rural land between UGA, UF and USC (in the football mad southeast) and has wond 6 1-AA titles since 85. They've played UGA and UF on occassion, and are near modest moarkets in Savannah, Macon and Charleston. (A shame they're not in Savannah, 45 miles away.) Their stats for 2002 noted an avg. of 12,000+ people for 9 home games, and the stadium seats about 17,000, I think.

I imagine someone there has to be thinking like the leaders at UMass; If we're ever going to do it, now might be the best time. The economic recession would hurt the funding drive for any improvements necessary, but as a Georgian I know that many locals hold more faith in GS than in GT. (Says a lot about my beloved Jackets, eh?)

If they had a bonifide conference to go to and felt they could easily meet the 1-A requirements without many additional funds right away, I would not be surprised to see them move up. The State of Georgia is growing quickly and many local sports fans would feel real depressed if Florida could field 5 successful 1-A programs while Ga. had only 2 programs period.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Jun 16, 2003 7:29 pm 
Offline
Freshman
Freshman

Joined: Mon Jun 16, 2003 7:15 pm
Posts: 2

Quote:
I haven't found anything concerning Ga Southern and a jump to 1-A, but would not be surprised if it happens. The school has slightly more students than Ga Tech, fills in the rural land between UGA, UF and USC (in the football mad southeast) and has wond 6 1-AA titles since 85. They've played UGA and UF on occassion, and are near modest moarkets in Savannah, Macon and Charleston. (A shame they're not in Savannah, 45 miles away.) Their stats for 2002 noted an avg. of 12,000+ people for 9 home games, and the stadium seats about 17,000, I think.

I imagine someone there has to be thinking like the leaders at UMass; If we're ever going to do it, now might be the best time. The economic recession would hurt the funding drive for any improvements necessary, but as a Georgian I know that many locals hold more faith in GS than in GT. (Says a lot about my beloved Jackets, eh?)

If they had a bonifide conference to go to and felt they could easily meet the 1-A requirements without many additional funds right away, I would not be surprised to see them move up. The State of Georgia is growing quickly and many local sports fans would feel real depressed if Florida could field 5 successful 1-A programs while Ga. had only 2 programs period.


Georgia Southern currently has no plans to go I-A. However, with the realignment of football in the coming years, you never know. Georgia Southern could meet the new requirements for I-A with no problem. Our attendance figures from last year include 3 playoff games that were not well attended. We probably averaged 7,500 for those 3 games. It also includes an season ending non-conference game that was played in the rain. We had already wrapped of the conference title. The average would have been around 16,000 without those for games. Our season opener with Savannah State was between 20 and 25,000.

Go over to www.southern-connection.com and check out the many opinions on moving to I-A. I will admit I am a supporter of the move.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Jun 16, 2003 10:36 pm 
GA Southern loves those fairly frequent I-AA Championships. That is tremendous considering they were not playing football in the modern era until the 80s'. They could move up to 1-A, but why mess with a good thing, at least for the moment.


Top
  
 
PostPosted: Tue Jun 17, 2003 2:18 pm 
Offline
CollegeSportsInfo Admin
CollegeSportsInfo Admin
User avatar

Joined: Thu Oct 17, 2002 8:05 am
Posts: 3811
From Division 2 to D-1AA
« Thread started on: Jun 16th, 2003, 7:39pm »

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
We know UC Davis, Northern Colorado, North Dakota State and South Dakota Stae is moving to D-1AA. Who else could make the move in a couple of years. My 2 cents worth will be North Dakota, South Dakota, Grand Valley State and Maybe others Comments.
143.81.254.2

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------



DawgNDuckFan
Full Member


member is offline









Posts: 269
Re: From Division 2 to D-1AA
« Reply #1 on: Today at 11:13am »

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
The University of North Alabama is an excellent D2 candidate to make the jump to I-AA. Also, Tuskegee is another good candidate to make a jump as well. Very underrated HBCU.



_________________
Image

Image@ncaasports Image csi.com/facebook

Image
Like the new CSI Userbar? Feel free to use it here and any other forums.
You can save and host it yourself or link from here.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Jun 17, 2003 3:16 pm 
Offline
Freshman
Freshman
User avatar

Joined: Thu Jun 05, 2003 2:38 am
Posts: 44
Location: Some Where in Montana
e University of North Alabama is an excellent D2 candidate to make the jump to I-AA. Also, Tuskegee is another good candidate to make a jump as well. Very underrated HBCU.

I go to UNA they voted no last year not enough schools and the stadium is for high school coffee. Its a very small campus.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Jun 18, 2003 6:40 am 
Offline
CollegeSportsInfo Admin
CollegeSportsInfo Admin
User avatar

Joined: Thu Oct 17, 2002 8:05 am
Posts: 3811
tarmac
Newbie


member is offline









Posts: 5
rename the football divisions?
« Thread started on: Jun 17th, 2003, 6:33pm »

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
There is a good discussion on the I-AA board about renaming the IA, IAA, D2 divisions in foofball. Here is the link.

http://www.anygivensaturday.org/cgi-bin/board/cutecast.pl?session=WU3fTJ6R58fCiE4DktdT5FdWal&forum=1&thread=85

_________________
Image

Image@ncaasports Image csi.com/facebook

Image
Like the new CSI Userbar? Feel free to use it here and any other forums.
You can save and host it yourself or link from here.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Jun 18, 2003 9:12 am 
Offline
Freshman
Freshman
User avatar

Joined: Wed May 14, 2003 9:10 am
Posts: 17
Location: Jonesboro, AR
Florida International is a D1AA football school that is currently a member of the Sun Belt Conference in all other sports. FIU has plans to move into D1A over the next few years although it may take until 2008 for them to make it all the way up since they have just started their program a couple of years ago. A friend of mine that is a coach at SW Texas State, told me that SWTS had plans to move to D1A a couple of years ago but have since slowed on that pursuit.

As far as D2 programs that may move toward D1AA soon, look for University of Central Arkansas to make the move up soon. They are in the process of upgrading all their athletic facilities, and have rollover contracts and high dollar salaries that many D2 schools don't have.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Jun 19, 2003 7:00 am 
Offline
All-Star
All-Star

Joined: Wed May 21, 2003 8:39 am
Posts: 1055
Location: Alabama
If all this ACC stuff happens see alot i mean alot of Division 2 schools push to Division 1-AA the rest will be left to almost extinction.

_________________
The Bear may be dead but he still hates Tennessee. Roll Damn Tide


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Jul 20, 2003 12:36 am 
WILBERFORCE, Ohio (AP)— Central State has a new football coach, but still no team.
Theo Lemon was hired Thursday to help the former NAIA powerhouse restart its program that was shut down six years ago. Lemon's first task will be to raise the money needed to field the team.

The Marauders won three NAIA national championships in the 1990s, but dropped football in 1997 after the NAIA suspended the team for two years for using ineligible players.

In June 2001, the school's board of trustees voted to restore football at the school through private donations. School officials said a football program would boost enrollment and increase financial contributions from alumni.

Lemon, the coach at the College of DuPage in Illinois the past two seasons, will be officially introduced at a news conference Friday.

Athletic director Teresa Check said he is a "good fit" for Central State, located 15 miles east of Dayton.

"He has great fund-raising abilities," Check said. "And academics is a big part of his coaching repertoire."

Check said about $600,000 has been raised from alumni and corporate donors, but that another $900,000 is needed before a team can be fielded. She said the team will initially be comprised of non-scholarship players and will play in NCAA Division II.

Lemon was an assistant coach at Central State from 1985-90. He was an assistant coach at Wake Forest from 1996-2000 and became head coach at DuPage in 2001, when the team went 5-5. Last season the Chaparrals were 2-8.

Central State won NAIA national championships in 1990, 1992 and 1995.



Top
  
 
PostPosted: Tue Jul 22, 2003 2:50 am 
Offline
All-Star
All-Star

Joined: Wed May 21, 2003 8:39 am
Posts: 1055
Location: Alabama
Longwood University is moving to Division 1 oh yes thats what i'm talking about. Another podunk school with enrollment of 2000. Barely can pay the faculty but they can move to D-1.

_________________
The Bear may be dead but he still hates Tennessee. Roll Damn Tide


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Jul 22, 2003 11:30 pm 
Offline
All-Star
All-Star

Joined: Wed May 21, 2003 8:39 am
Posts: 1055
Location: Alabama
Birmingham Post-Herald.

Leaping Panthers
Birmingham-Southern makes jump to Division I
By CARY ESTES
BIRMINGHAM POST-HERALD
Now is the time for Birmingham-Southern College to prove that its athletic program is good enough to be in NCAA Division I.

And to prove that it is not as bad as NCAA Division I.

On Sept. 1, Birmingham-Southern will end a four-year transitional period that has taken it from the no-publicity world of the NAIA to the spotlight of NCAA Division I.

In theory, at least, BSC is now on the same stage as Ohio State and Syracuse and Florida. They are part of a 327-member club that plays some of the best amateur athletics in the world

"It's a whole different game in Division I," longtime BSC soccer coach Preston Goldfarb said. "It's a different level of play, a different athlete. They're bigger and stronger and faster. And there's so many of them. They can run them in left and right. We don't have that luxury here yet.

"But ours, you can run in and out academically. We can do that."

And there lies the challenge for Birmingham-Southern. A challenge that is perhaps as great as the task facing it on the courts and playing fields.

The school is entering the big-time at a moment when some people wonder whether top-level college athletics have become too big. They are concerned that the rapid increase of television money in recent years has overwhelmed the student part of student-athletes.

"It's a whole different game in Division I," said BSC soccer coach Goldfarb.
So the main question facing Birmingham-Southern might not be whether it can succeed on the Division I playing fields. It might be whether it can keep from failing off them.

"It's a legitimate concern," BSC President Neal Berte said. "The key is to maintain the academic program. We have to achieve that balance.

"So far, we have not seen anything about this move that is not a plus for us. We hope that's going to continue. With the quality of our coaches, the leadership of (Athletic Director) Joe Dean and the commitment from the board of trustees, I don't anticipate that changing. I really don't."

Birmingham-Southern is a private liberal arts college with an enrollment of only 1,400, making it the fourth-smallest school in Division I. Academics always has been the driving force behind the university. To the people within the college, the thought of having tutors do schoolwork for athletes in order to keep them eligible or allowing boosters to pay players seems ludicrous at such a place.

So instead of the money and power of Division I corrupting the university, school officials hope the university can help improve the image of Division I.

"I think we can be a beacon of what college athletics are supposed to be about," BSC head basketball coach Duane Reboul said. "There are several institutions — the Stanfords and the Vanderbilts — who fall into that role. I think Birmingham-Southern can be that beacon for the smaller universities. Colleges who are not going to be compromised in academics and social behavior, and who still strive to be successful on the courts."

Some of the athletics success already has occurred. During the school's transitional period, BSC defeated several established Division I schools in a variety of sports, including Connecticut (baseball and softball), East Carolina (men's basketball), Georgia (baseball), Memphis (volleyball), Mississippi State (baseball), Pittsburgh (men's soccer), Texas A&M (men's basketball) and Vanderbilt (baseball).

"We couldn't beat those schools day in and day out. We couldn't compete at that level day in and day out," said Dean, who was hired as BSC's athletics director in 1999 to oversee the move to Division I. "But on a given day, little 'ol Birmingham Southern can rise up and shock the world, if you will. That's exciting for our kids, exciting for our institution, and it just brings a lot of positive feedback to our school."

That feedback is one of the main reasons why Birmingham-Southern decided to make this move. Despite some of the negative publicity associated with Division I athletics, having sports teams still is one of the best ways for a university to achieve national name recognition. For example, the success of Gonzaga in the NCAA men's basketball tournament in recent years has created tremendous exposure for the Jesuit college located in Spokane, Wash.

"We've already seen name-recognition in other parts of the country and recruitment interest, not only as it relates to those athletes," Berte said. "People are learning more about Birmingham-Southern, what kind of school we are."

For years, BSC was the kind of school where athletics did not matter much. The college was part of the National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics (NAIA), which had nothing in common with the NCAA except for a couple of letters. Goldfarb said when he arrived at the school 20 years ago, he had to recruit students from the dorms in order to have enough players to field a soccer team.

"We didn't have a field, any equipment. We had nothing," Goldfarb said. "Now where we are is state-of-the-art in fields and equipment and offices and support. That's the most important thing. We've had great support from the administration and everyone around us.

"I loved the NAIA. But NCAA Division I certainly is better. It's better for us, it's better for our kids. It certainly improves your recruiting. It provides more publicity for the school. It really was a no-brainer to do this. In the long run, it's going to prove its worth ten-fold. It's going to be so good."

Basketball is the only sport in which BSC is not a full-fledged Division I member yet. The program must wait two more years before reaching postseason eligibility.
The most difficult part of this transition, according to several BSC officials, has been the inability of the school's athletics teams to be in any type of postseason play the past two seasons. Birmingham-Southern left the NAIA after the 2000-01 season, then had to spend two years as a provisional NCAA member before becoming eligible for the postseason.

That changes this season, with the exception of men's basketball, which still must wait two more years before reaching postseason eligibility.

"The biggest thing I'm excited about is when I go to the games now and see our student-athletes competing, I know that every game is going to mean even more for them," said Leslie Claybrook, BSC's senior women's administrator. "Now they have a chance to play at the NCAA level and compete in the postseason. That's so important for them."
Goldfarb agreed.

"You can only dangle a carrot in front of their face for so long," he said. "When the final game came the last two years, they knew it was over. We had nowhere to go. Now they can play in the (conference) tournament and have a chance to do something.

"All we wanted was a chance. Now we have it. Because of that chance, it gives us a new outlook, a new enthusiasm. It's the anticipation of seeing whether we can stack up."

Without slacking up academically.

"We're very aware that we have student-athletes and not just athletes," said Ann Dielen, who has been a tennis coach at BSC for 25 years. "Our main goal should not be just to win, but to influence these young people and get them into med school and dental school and law school.

"We've always wanted them to have an overall college experience. I see no reason to change that."

_________________
The Bear may be dead but he still hates Tennessee. Roll Damn Tide


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 107 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 ... 8  Next

All times are UTC - 5 hours


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
 

 




Looking for College Sports apparel? Support our partner:








Support Our Partners: Search Engine Marketing - Search Engine Optimization - Search Engine Training - Online Marketing for Restuarants

Subway Map Shirts - Food and Travel

Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group