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PostPosted: Sat Jan 26, 2008 8:34 pm 
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I was thinking about Universities renaming themselves and how it can open the door for improvements in their standing.

A number of larger universities have re-branded themselves in the last 20-30 years to very good effect. Memphis State became the University of Memphis. North Texas State University became the University of North Texas. Southwest Texas State became Texas State. Southwestern Missouri is now Missouri State. Southeastern Louisiana tried to become the university of Louisiana, but was thwarted by the State legislature.

I think naming is a way that a school can (relatively) quickly buck the system and change the impression, focus, and general direction of the University and affect positive change.

I know a lot of posters on this site ridiculed Missou State when they changed the name saying that no one would ever judge them beyond what they started out to be. I don't think this is the case. When you take into account that, including slackers, a university turns over it's enrollment ever 5 years or so, and that young people discover universities maybe 10 years before they go to college at most, Missou State will effectively be established as the "state" school in Missou by say 2012 or so, despite academics' protests. They have effectively leapfrogged UMKC and UMSTL --- former equivalent schools.

I do understand that technically a land grant flagship is almost always going to be a better school that some johnny come lately, because they are more established and have greater resources sunk into them over a long period of time, but by the same token there appears to be a pecking order based on names.

(In all of the examples below, "X" refers to the name of the state.)

1) Tier 1 - the "University of X" --- generally the best a state has to offer. Generally the flagship, although there are exceptions (Ohio State and LSU are flagships of their states and A&M shares the flagship designation in Texas.). Now to be clear of my point, officially, UT is the "University of Texas at Austin", but in practice anyone you mention the University of Texas to is not going to ask "Did you mean UT Austin or UT Dallas?" UT Austin owns the UT name --- UT Dallas, UTEP, UT- Arlington, UTSA and others just borrow it. They are just trying to soak up some of that good name to gain legitimacy. (I do recognize that all are in the UT system and that is the stated reason behind it's use. I just don't think that is the honest point of it in this day.)

2) Tier 2 - "X State University" --- in most states the largest State university is designated "X State". Sometimes their academics are just shy of the University school of the state. Sometimes thy are way off. There are exceptions. Some states have #2 public schools that are Techs or A&Ms (Georgia Tech, Louisiana Tech) instead of a well developed "X State" school.

3) Tier 3 - "X Tech" and "X A&M" schools --- this can be a real hit or miss category. A lot of states have tiny A&M schools or tech schools that would rank as a tier 7 school, but a well sized Tech or A&M gets pretty good attention.

4) Tier 4 - "(Major City) University" or "University of (Major City)" --- Large schools designed to serve a major metro area can differentiate themselves from smaller state schools by adopting the city name. Often they are referred to just by the city name. As I mentioned earlier, schools like Cinnci and Houston, have been joined by Memphis. This technique really only seems to have positive results when the city and university are large.

5) Tier 5 "North/South/West/East/Central X University" or "University of North/South/West/East/Central X" - Unidirectional Schools. I think these schools are on the rise in terms of esteem. I think we will soon see a day when lower tier 2, and all of larger Tier 4, and larger Tier 5 occupy effectively the same tier behind the flagships and really elite state, tech, & A&M schools. UNT, S. Illinois are good examples.

6) Tier 6 - "(Major City) State University" - This is a state University in a major city that refuses to escape from the shadow of the state school or is not legislatively allowed to do so.

7) Tier 7 - "NW/SE/NE/SW X University" or "University of NW/SE/NE/SW X" and "(Name) State University" and "(Minor City) State University" and "(Minor City/name/whatever) A&M University" and "University of X - (city)" - Almost all of these universities are small time. They are either designed to serve a very small region of a state or are trying to borrow legitimacy from a system of schools or a flagship. NW Louisiana. Sam Houston State University. West Texas A&M. UT-Tyler. UL-Monroe is technically not that, but might as well be.

I think it a name change on a small school is often like putting lipstick on a pig. It is still a pig.

But a name change on a larger school --- say 15K to 30K or more can dramatically affect a university, changing the long term direction of the university, the focus of student recruitment, and nationwide public perception.

When Texas State dropped the Bi-directional prefix from their name successfully, the size of the university and its political weight in the state started to become apparent. This will lead Texas State to be seen as a player in the state and become a recognized national name within a couple generations.

When UNT dropped the "state" from their name, I would argue they moved from one of an endless number of faceless state schools to the dominant public school for the North region.

When Memphis State dropped the state designation from their name, i would argue that they embraced the identity of the city like Houston rather than just being one of a million "(city) State" schools. It is a little like graduating from the need to have the state's state University system propping you up.

Utah Valley State College is smartly shortening their name when they become a full university this year. Utah Valley University is not a bad choice when you consider what is already taken. Shorter is usually better.

I think there are a number of schools that would profit from re-branding. Here are some I would argue in my region. many of these might get resistance from the state system, but some might not.

NW Louisiana and SE Louisiana --- these are both schools that might one day grow into FBS candidates. They would be smart to re-brand their schools now that SW and NE Louisiana have re-branded as ULL and ULM. They probably would not get resistance. The Universities of North Louisiana and South Louisiana would brand to appeal to the northern and southern halves of the state and both schools could see some quick growth and positive direction change from that re-branding.

Metropolitan University might strongly consider renaming itself as Denver Metropolitan University or Denver U. I think they hurt their enrollment and public perception by not cluing anyone in on where they are based. Not having Denver in the name would be especially unhelpful if they ever looked to do sports seriously.

UTEP and UTSA might seriously consider renaming their universities. It would be worth it to fight the system to allow them to drop UT from their names. UTEP could be Texas Western again or El Paso University. UTSA could be the San Antonio University. I think re-branding could really help underscore their similarities to Universities like Houston and Memphis --- or barring that UNT (I am only saying it would help.) and would also set them apart as major independent universities serving major cities and not the satellite university riff-raff.

UT-Arlington baffles me. They would be a 1000 times more successful and well known as Dallas/Forth Worth University (DFW U). I think most people in the Metroplex don't even know that they are by far the second largest university in the DFW Metroplex. They are an enormous university located halfway between Dallas and Fort Worth. At 25K or 26K, they are not far behind UNT in enrollment ---technically part of the metroplex, but to the north.

Sam Houston State University and Stephen F. Austin State University should Join Lamar in not having a "state" in their names. These are tribute schools that sound like independent elite liberal art schools. Putting "state" in their names, just lessens them to the level of the other small Texas satellite schools. That is hardly a tribute.

UALR might consider becoming Little Rock University. They would parallel Memphis well and the name change would amount to a big jump in the food change raising them above being an equal to UA-Fort Smith as a cookie cutter satellite of U. of Arkansas, for example.

Wichita State might chose Wichita University. Cleveland State might consider the University of Cleveland to parallel U of Cinnci. IUPUI would be smart to fight to be Indianapolis University.

Other universities?



Last edited by finiteman on Sat Jan 26, 2008 8:57 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Sat Jan 26, 2008 10:40 pm 
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I'm assuming this only applies to public schools (i.e. Caltech and MIT are privates with Tech in their name, but are way higher than tier 3). A "Tech" designation doesn't have to mean "Tier 3"; rather it can imply "focus on engineering" and related studies. See Virginia Tech, Georgia Tech, Michigan Tech, Texas Tech, etc... Also, most schools in a system generally have similar names and also share administrative resources (i.e. you won't see something like UC-Fresno because Fresno State is in the Cal State system).

Here are a few schools to add to what you already mentioned:
* Southern Illinois University- Edwardsville should at least go to University of Illinois- Edwardsville. The problem is they share a president with the other SIU campus.

* Someone in the Cal State system should push to be known as simply "Cal State" a la the Berkeley campus in the UC system is known as "Cal" (or Berkeley)

* Boise State --- University of Boise (growing city)

* Youngstown State --- University of Youngstown, possibly similar arguments for Bowling Green State and Kent State (although the whole country I think will forever know that university as Kent State because of the events there in 1971, so maybe no change there)


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PostPosted: Sat Jan 26, 2008 11:48 pm 
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Excellent topic!

Obviously there are psychological dimensions and associations in a name. When talking about conference membership, we know the biased impressions toward directional names, particularly among the elite configurations. While directional names, and city names, distinguish location generally, they are innate qualifiers as well, except for those in more trendy or flashy locations.

USC, Miami, BC, UCLA, or even SMU may be among the exceptions.

Remember when UTEP was Texas Western? Texas Western had some good bb at one time.

Should Georgia Southern be University of Southern Georgia? Or take the William & Mary avenue and be George-Anne University? Don't laugh, the student newspaper is named George-Anne. Sounds academic, regal, and historic to me.

Who suffers with directional names? East Carolina would be a bet. Southern Mississippi? Actually, that one sounds very appropriate and connected. South Florida just trumps Central Florida by name.

The Louisiana--somethings never really got straightened out. LSU is probably glad it hasn't.

How many people really know the differences between Mississippi, Mississippi State and Southern Miss? For the even less knowledgeable, throw in Mississippi Valley State too or Mississippi University for Women (that one in Columbus, MS, next to Alabama border could be called something less sexist such as University of East Mississippi).

South Carolina Upstate? Thought the Spartanburg name attached to the Univ. of So. Carolina was more clear.

Eastern Michigan, Western Michigan and Central Michigan? There's a Northern Michigan too, and Wisconsin--wherever'?

Many more examples--- but its identity vs know-your-place---oftentimes.







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PostPosted: Mon Jan 28, 2008 6:35 pm 
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similar thread topic already here:

http://collegesportsinfo/forum/viewtopic.php?t=1363&start=0


Based on the article:
University Name Changes and the Marketing Impact


The NAME is the GAME: University Name Changes and the Marketing Impact

Southwest Texas St. University Normal School was founded in 1903 in San Marcos, Texas. Fast forward one hundred years and the school is now named Texas St. In those 100 years, the school grew and went through a total of 5 name changes. You might look at some of the earlier changes and think to yourself that these changes were entirely linked to the growth of a school, as well as the upgrade from a traditional College to a University. The most recent change does not fit that pattern at all.

In 2003, Southwest Texas St. changed their name to Texas St. This move was not made because the school had gone through any monumental change. It was a name change with one thing in mind: marketing and re-branding the university. In a state where the collegiate scene is dominated by University of Texas (ever since the folding of the Southwest Conference which featured other Texas schools such as Texas A&M, Baylor, Rice, Houston, SMU and TCU), Texas St. has made an attempt to step in and take a coveted spot in the school-name game: The flagship State University. In the process they would follow a trend of schools in recent years and attempt to drop a directional school nomenclature such as southwestern.

When you look across the country y one will see that many of the states have two university systems. In Texas, you have the University of Texas system which includes the main campus in Austin, as well as satellite campuses in El Paso, Arlington, Dallas, San Antonio and 10 other locations. The Texas State University system includes such schools as Lamar University, Sam Houston St., and Sul Ross St. What has been missing in the landscape of the Texas schools had been a clearly defined Texas State. Since 2003, that void has been filled. Southwest Texas St. is now Texas State University-San Marcos.

The trend to change a schools name to fill a marketing void and capitalize on a brand is nothing new.

Historically, there have been a plethora of common name changes. Many had to do with the restructuring of school systems within each state. For instance, many of the older A&M schools (Agriculture & Mining, Agriculture & Mechanical Arts) became part of a State system. This is what happened to Colorado A&M which became Colorado St. in 1957. New Mexico College of Agriculture and Mechanical Arts became New Mexico State University in 1960. You will find many similar changes over the last 50 years with school names. At the time many of these such changes were made, it is difficult to determine if they were for any branding benefits or if they were for more simplistic reasons such as school system restructuring on a state level. In recent years, we have seen some more obvious changes.

Bayou Battle

An intriguing story can be found in the Bayou State. Louisiana is a state that much like Ohio, is dominated in the public eye by the premiere state university. Louisiana State University might have just as much political favor as they do fan favor. In 1984, Southwest Louisiana University, changed their name to the University of Louisiana with the blessing of the then Board of Trustees for State Colleges and Universities (now The University of Louisiana System Board of Supervisors). As the largest school in the UL system, the name change made sense to most, but it did not hold up. Shortly after the name change was processed, The Louisiana Board of Regents filed suit with the Board of Trustees. Twenty-five days later, District Judge William H. Brown stripped the University of Louisiana name and forced them back to the Southwest Louisiana University name. The suit also removed the ability for future name changes by the Board of Trustees.

In order for any future name changes to take place, it meant compromise. And the only compromise to the seemingly impossible blockade by the Louisiana Board of Regents came in the form of Act 45. This compromise has been called the LSU Rule as it would force schools such as Southwest Louisiana University and Northeast Louisiana University to agree to put LSU on a virtual pedestal within the state of Louisiana. ACT 45 required that at least two state universities change their name at the same time and that all universities who change their name change it to University of Louisiana at [city designation]. It stipulated that the city designation must be used in all official university business and has since grown far beyond its original legislative language, to regulate minute details such as font sizes to be used by the respective universities. Additionally, the bill insisted that LSU was, and would remain, the flagship university of Louisiana. This was a strange legislative act with little tie-in to LSU or the LSU System. The act also changed the name of the Board of Trustees to the University of Louisiana Board of Supervisors.

In 1999, fifteen years after the first attempt at a name change, Southwest Louisiana University became the University of Louisiana-Lafayette and Northeast Louisiana University became University of Louisiana-Monroe. While the change was not entirely what USL was looking for, it did allow them to finally drop the directional school label.

Filling the Void in Missouri

When Texas St. came to be in 2003, it opened eyes at other institutions. A name change had been discussed in previous years by Southwest Missouri State, but had complications. Unlike the situation in Texas in which there were no other directional schools, Missouri had both Southwest Missouri State and Southeast Missouri State universities. That was not the biggest problem they faced. Like the University of Louisiana-Lafayette issue with LSU, SWMS had initially proposed a name change in 1985 as it was the second largest school in the state. SWMS was fortunate enough that despite oppositions by the University of Missouri State system, on March 1st, 2005, Southwest Missouri State formally changed their name to Missouri State University.


Benefits

The benefits of some of these name changes can be seen in a few areas. Outside of athletics, these name changes have brought a stronger brand to the universities. Applications will continue to rise which should increase the academic standards from each university. When looking at athletics, there is a noticeable benefit as well. In recent years, we have seen the University of Louisiana-Monroe upgrade their football to FBS (formerly I-A) and join the Sunbelt Conference for all sports. Even Missouri State flirted with an upgrade to join the Sunbelt, with rumors of conversations that started without any announced formal upgrade by the school.

And in the past few weeks, Texas State has made strides to upgrade their football program to FBS, with a likely destination being the Sunbelt. When you see programs such as Boise St. and South Florida having impacts on the FBS level, it is not a stretch to say that 20 years from now Missouri St. and Texas St. could be fully upgraded and competing with the likes of Texas and Missouri.



What Does the Future Hold?

When you look across the country, any potential name changes are based entirely on opportunity and availability. These would usually require that a school participate in Division I athletics or planning an upgrade. There are some states that seem fairly covered, with a traditional system such as Mississippi, which has the University of Mississippi and a Mississippi State University. Most of the Western, Southern and Midwestern states already have the traditional spots occupied. But there are a few ideas worth taking a look at although none are very likely to happen.

Connecticut:
No school is in a better position to take advantage of an opening than Central Connecticut State University. When you look at the 5 public schools other than the University of Connecticut, CCSU and their enrollment of 10,000 would be the best bet (WCSU has an enrollment of under 6000, SCSU at 6000, and ECSU at 5,000). As the second largest state school in Connecticut, the opportunity to gain more exposure for the state itself should be the push for the state legislature to rename the school Connecticut State University.

When you look at the role the athletic programs could play, the move becomes even more attractive. Central Connecticut State has a formidable FCS level football program. Their other sports participate in the Northeast Conference in which they are the only public school member. A name change could open doors for the school to join the America East Conference with regional members University of Maine, University of New Hampshire, Boston University, University of Vermont, Albany and others in the northeast.

California:
There is already the University of California system with powerhouse universities such as California (the flagship campus in Berkley) as well as UCLA and even FCS football member UC-Davis. The California State system is a bit different. You have Sacramento State located in the state capital and San Jose St. not far away. You also have other larger schools in Fresno St. and San Diego St. When you look at the miniscule prospects of a PAC-10 expansion, it is unlikely that any of those schools would be considered. However, what if Fresno St. University or San Diego St. University petitioned to be officially renamed California State University. Such a move would over time change the perception of the individual school and could potentially allow the school to become part of the PAC-10. The PAC-10 already houses Washington & Washington St., Oregon & Oregon St., Arizona and Arizona St., both the FBS University of California schools and private schools Stanford and USC.

Maine:
A small total number of schools. One should not expect candidates anytime soon.

Maryland:
Maryland is a state with some clear openings for a potential power player. In addition to the University of Maryland system with 3 Division I schools, there are a number of Division I state schools such as Coppin St., Morgan St, and Towson (formerly Towson State). Both Coppin St. and Morgan state are proudly entrenched in the MEAC conference, and both as distinguished as HBSU institutions. Towson has preformed some recent stadium upgrades and brought their football program to the CAA, it’s home for all other sports. Towson could be a candidate for a Maryland St. name change if they ever brought it forward.

Massachusetts:
UMass actually started out as an agricultural school but eventually became the flagship of the University of Massachusetts system. There are 9 schools in the Massachusetts State College system, but none are Division I or likely candidates. Should any of the smaller state schools upgrade to Division I, perhaps we would see a Massachusetts State University.

Minnesota:
Minnesota has only one flagship school in Division I, but has a number of schools in Division II , many of which currently operate in the Minnesota State system. Candidates for a Division I Minnesota State include Bemidji State University (4900 students), Concordia University (2069 students), University of Minnesota Crookston (2100 students), University of Minnesota Duluth (11000 students), Minnesota State University - Mankato (13800 students), Minnesota State University Moorhead (7600 students), Southwest Minnesota State University (3700 students), St. Cloud State University (15600 students), Winona State University (8270 students).

There are a number of candidates here that might seek upgrades to Division I athletics in the future. But the larger schools such as Minnesota St-Mankato and St. Cloud State would be the logical fit for a lone Minnesota State should they ever upgrade. Right about now you are probably thinking about the television show “Coach”.

Nebraska:
The school currently has only the University of Nebraska-Lincoln and Creighton University participating in Division I. While Nebraska-Omaha has discussed an upgrade to Division I, it has not happened yet. And if it did, the schools position within the University of Nebraska system would likely keep them out of contention for a Nebraska St. name change. Same goes for Nebraska-Kearney. Wayne St and Chardon State with roughly 3,000 students each are likely too small to upgrade and change their names. All four mentioned schools participate in Division II.

New Hampshire:
The state consists of the University of New Hampshire and a number of smaller colleges. Only Division II Southern New Hampshire holds a university label. With less than 2000 students, the school is just too small.

New Jersey:
Already in a strange situation since the official state university is Rutgers-The State University of New Jersey. There is also the recent upgrade for NJ Tech. But without a true University of New Jersey system, an official UNJ is never going to happen. Many have called for a name change for Rutgers to the University of New Jersey or at least New Jersey St.. If this ever happened, it would open doors for schools like Monmouth and Rider to swipe the NJ State name. It is highly unlikely that such changes would ever happen.

Nevada:
It is a stretch to think that the UNLV school name would benefit from a change to Nevada St. There are not any other realistic options for Nevada.

Ohio:
While Ohio St. serves as the states flagship school, there is no traditional University of Ohio system. Ohio University in Athens is the closest to that distinction.

Rhode Island:
A small state with very few schools. Private school Bryant University is transitioning to Division I, but is not an option.

Wisconsin:
This is another state with a unique situation. There are 3 Division I schools in the UW system with the 4th Division school being private Marquette. There is only one Division II school in UW-Parkside and 25 schools that are Division III. Even if there were some reclassification of the Wisconsin school system, it is unlikely that any school would qualify for any renaming as Wisconsin St.

Wyoming:
The University of Wyoming is the only Division I school or university in the state. In order for there to be any options, there would need to be some growth at some of the other schools in the state (Casper College-Casper, Central Wyoming College-Riverton, Eastern Wyoming College-Torrington, Laramie County Community College-Cheyenne, Northwest College-Powell, Sheridan College-Sheridan, Western Wyoming Community College). If there was any success at any of those schools, perhaps Wyoming State University could be born.

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PostPosted: Tue Jan 29, 2008 12:05 am 
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If Sam Houston State University and Stephen F. Austin State University copied Lamar University, they would have names like Houston University and Austin University.


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PostPosted: Mon Feb 04, 2008 2:16 pm 
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Quote:
If Sam Houston State University and Stephen F. Austin State University copied Lamar University, they would have names like Houston University and Austin University.


Let's not be obtuse. Flipping your logic, Lamar isn't Lamar State.

Both Stephen F. Austin and Sam Houston are well branded university names. Tagging them with the "state" add on, only diminishes these schools by making them similar to the 60 other podunk state universities in Texas. Keep your branding, but drop the "state" from your title. Be Stephen F. Austin (U) and Sam Houston (U).


Last edited by finiteman on Mon Feb 04, 2008 2:26 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Mon Feb 04, 2008 2:40 pm 
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Quote:
I'm assuming this only applies to public schools (i.e. Caltech and MIT are privates with Tech in their name, but are way higher than tier 3). A "Tech" designation doesn't have to mean "Tier 3"; rather it can imply "focus on engineering" and related studies. See Virginia Tech, Georgia Tech, Michigan Tech, Texas Tech, etc... Also, most schools in a system generally have similar names and also share administrative resources (i.e. you won't see something like UC-Fresno because Fresno State is in the Cal State system).


Excellent points that I glazed over in my opening post.

I certainly did not mean to imply tier 3 in academic terms, only that in general the top "state" university seems to hold a status higher than the top Tech or A&M. Generally, but there are very notable exceptions.


Quote:
Here are a few schools to add to what you already mentioned:
* Southern Illinois University- Edwardsville should at least go to University of Illinois- Edwardsville. The problem is they share a president with the other SIU campus.


I think they are 20 years away from naming being an issue. (Still too small.)


Quote:
* Someone in the Cal State system should push to be known as simply "Cal State" a la the Berkeley campus in the UC system is known as "Cal" (or Berkeley)


I thought about listing the UC and Cal-state schools as an exception. There are simply a ton of FBS size (15k+ enrollment) schools in the Cal State and UC systems. In fact the vast majority of the schools in both systems fit that criteria. In essence, the entire system has matured as a network of low-budget sports schools. Nowhere else in the country.


Quote:
* Boise State --- University of Boise (growing city)

* Youngstown State --- University of Youngstown, possibly similar arguments for Bowling Green State and Kent State (although the whole country I think will forever know that university as Kent State because of the events there in 1971, so maybe no change there)


These are two excellent examples of where branding would help both schools a lot, IMO.


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PostPosted: Sat Mar 15, 2008 8:47 am 
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Connecticut

All of the directional "Connecticut State Universities" should rename themselves "University of (directional) Connecticut" except for Central Connecticut State, which should simply become "Connecticut State University". This actually leaves an opening for the "University of Northern Connecticut".

Oklahoma:

Northwestern Oklahoma State = University of Northern Oklahoma
Northeastern Oklahoma State = University of Eastern Oklahoma
Northeastern Oklahoma State-Broken Arrow = University of Eastern Oklahoma-Broken Arrow
Southeastern Oklahoma State = University of Southern Oklahoma
Southwestern Oklahoma State = University of Western Oklahoma
East Central University = University of Eastern Oklahoma-Ada
Oklahoma Panhandle State University = Oklahoma Panhandle University


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PostPosted: Sat Mar 15, 2008 9:24 am 
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Here are some more I'd like to propose:

Jacksonville (AL) State = Unversity of East Alabama
University of Alabama at Huntsville = Alabama Institute of Technology ("Alabama Tech")
University of Montevallo (AL) = University of Central Alabama
Austin Peay (TN) State University = University of Western Tennessee
East Tennessee State University = University of Eastern Tennessee
Middle Tennessee State University = University of Middle Tennessee

If it were possible to undo the past:
Western Kentucky University should be Southern Kentucky University
Murray State University should be Western Kentucky University
Eastern Kentucky University should be Central Kentucky University
Morehead State University should be Eastern Kentucky University

Southern Kentucky would lose its extension in Owensboro to Western Kentucky (real-life Murray State), and lose the Fort Knox/Elizabethtown extension to the University of Louisville. Should those mature into separate universities, they can become the University of Owensboro and the University of Elizabethtown.


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PostPosted: Sat Mar 15, 2008 7:44 pm 
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A lot of neat ideas, but I think rebranding doesn't do much for a public university until they at least get to 10-15K enrollment. Becoming Conn. State would be smart, but the others for the most part hit me as too small to get much out of rebranding.


Last edited by finiteman on Sat Mar 15, 2008 7:51 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Sat Mar 22, 2008 8:46 am 
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A few more:

* University of North Carolina at Charlotte should become simply University of Charlotte, since the athletic department already refers to themselves as Charlotte

* Old Dominion University should become University of Norfolk, another large city that is currently not utilizing this naming convention.

* University of Arkansas-Little Rock should become University of Little Rock, same reasons as the others.


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PostPosted: Sat Mar 22, 2008 11:49 am 
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1: UNC CHarlotte has been promised by the UNC System President to be granted flagship status as soon as they reach 24,000 students. Officially changing the campus name would be a slap in the face of that offer.

2: Old Dominion is already one of five Virginia State Flagship Universities, and the officially designated Sea Grant school In addition, there is also the HBCU Norfolk State. What's next? University of Charlottesville? University of Blacksburg? University of Williamsburg?

3: UALR is the Home of the UA Medical School, Law School, and the household pets portion of the Vetrenary school (The rest of the Vet School is in Fort Smith). It spends roughly twice the amount research Fayetteville does.


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Quote:
1: UNC CHarlotte has been promised by the UNC System President to be granted flagship status as soon as they reach 24,000 students. Officially changing the campus name would be a slap in the face of that offer.

2: Old Dominion is already one of five Virginia State Flagship Universities, and the officially designated Sea Grant school In addition, there is also the HBCU Norfolk State. What's next? University of Charlottesville? University of Blacksburg? University of Williamsburg?

3: UALR is the Home of the UA Medical School, Law School, and the household pets portion of the Vetrenary school (The rest of the Vet School is in Fort Smith). It spends roughly twice the amount research Fayetteville does.


1: Why would that be a slap in the face? Not all universities in that system follow the naming convention UNC-X. Look at Western Carolina, East Carolina, Appalachian State.

2: Norfolk State probably doesn't have as many resources as ODU, and the two can coexist ala U of Chicago and Chicago State. And I'm merely making suggestions based off the assumptions of the original post of this thread. UVa and VaTech aren't changing their names and neither is William & Mary (the 2nd oldest higher-learning institute in the country). Don't ridicule my suggestions based on something that I did not post.

3: Again, nothing wrong with being part of a system and adopting this naming style (see U of Memphis). Looking above, this suggestion was also made in the first post of the thread; why didn't you criticize it then?


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PostPosted: Mon Mar 31, 2008 8:55 pm 
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The point is that each of them has a relatively statewide name, and changing them to a more local name is like renaming U.C. Davis the University of Central California, or U.T. Austin University of Austin, or Uuniversity of South Carolina-Columbia Columbia State! ;)


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PostPosted: Mon Mar 31, 2008 9:27 pm 
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I'm not sure ODU would gain anything by becoming the University of Norfolk. If anything, it's a case where segregation left enough inertia in place to maintain two public universities in the same city. Old Dominion is also a state nickname, so effectively it is Virginia U.

If we were to rename Virginia's schools per the methodology outlined above,

Christopher Newport U - Newport News U
Eastern Virginia Medical School - unchanged
George Mason U - U of Northern Virginia
James Madison U - U of Harrsionburg
Longwood U - U of Southern Virginia
Marine Corps U - unchanged
Norfolk State U - U of Norfolk (unless if it merges with Old Dominion)
Old Dominion U - Eastern Virginia U
Radford U - unchanged
Mary Washington U - U of Fredericksburg
U of Virginia - unchanged
U of Virginia at Wise - unchanged
Virginia Commonwealth U - unchanged (functional equivalent of "Virginia State U")
Virginia Military Institute - unchanged
Virginia Polytechnic Institure and State University - drops "and State University"
Virginia State U - unchanged, but should merge with VCU
William and Mary - Williamsburg U

VCU could also be Central Virginia if you didn't want both a Virgina Commonwealth and a Virginia State.


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